The Shubenacadie River

The Shubenacadie River

Location, Location, Location

The Shubenacadie River has a meander of approximately 72 km from its source at Schubenacadie Grand lake to its mouth at historic seaport village of Maitland on Cobequid Bay, the site of where ‘William D. Lawrence’,the largest wooden ship ever built was constructed.The river  ows through part of northern Halifax County, forming the boundary with Hants County before forming the boundary between Hants and Colchester County. The Shubenacadie Valley hosts a diversi ed agricultural economy and is also experiencing a growth in suburban development, given its location in the Halifax-Truro transportation corridor

Fun in the Mud!

There are plenty of activities to enjoy along the Shubenacadie River, one of the most popular activities could in involve you getting just a little bit muddy! People come from all over the world to experience the Tidal Bore rafting adventures. The lower 30 km of the river is tidal and the river experiences a tidal bore twice daily, with some bores reaching up to 3 meters in height at certain points along the river. Local tourism operators o er forming the boundary with Hants County before forming the boundary between Hants and Colchester County. The Shubenacadie Valley hosts a diversi ed agricultural economy and is also experiencing a growth in suburban development, given its location in the Halifax-Truro transportation corridor

adventure seekers a chance to ride with the bore on high-horse power Zodiac Hurricanes. Besides getting to ride the tidal bore, adventure seekers can enjoy swimming in bath temperature waters and go sliding on some of the best mud banks in the Maritimes. In 2009, the ‘I Backpack Canada blog’ named the Shubenacadie one of the top  ve whitewater rivers in Canada.

Wildlife

For wildlife and nature lovers, the Shubenacadie River o ers regular sighting’s of Bald Eagles, thanks to an abundant food supply. For more guaranteed wildlife spotting there’s the Shubenacadie Wildlife Park. Owned and operated by the Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources, this 40 hectare

facility has been thrilling millions of visitors for over 60 years. Wheelchair accessible and shaded pathways provide an open, yet intimate environment for easy viewing of the animals. Most of the animals at the park arrive there from other zoological facilities in North America where they were born in captivity so they feel at ease around people are usually visible to visitors. The park is home to a wide variety of mammals and birds including, the Arctic Fox, Gray Wolf, Bobcat,

Cougar, Moose, Big Horn Sheep, Red Golden Pheasant,Great Horned Owl, Red-tailed Hawk to name but a few! The park also o ers Wildlife photography and lming opportunities in the winter months, for a small fee groups of up to 4 people can be guided by a sta member to the best vantage points and locations to capture the animals.